Sunday, May 27, 2012

CWs - Down and Dirty

Lately I have been fiddling around with my new Austrains CWs, trying to replicate there in service appearance. After having a look over James McInerney's Lambing Flat Blog. I was blown away by the weathering effort applied to his model of 1948 CW 27785. I gave James a call, hoping to extract a few secrets. I quickly learnt that there are no secrets and the process is described in AMRM August 07 by James himself. After having a read I armed myself with a paint brush and went crazy. Below are a few pictures. I will have get the airbrush out and spray the under frames, then weather with similar methods. Once the model is back together I will brown the whole thing up a little, probably with powders? Not sure yet?
Side One

Side One

The other side

The other side again

While on the under frames I think I may remove two of the gussets along the side. After looking at photos it does seem as if there are only suppose to be three. Would love to get some feedback on this.

Oh well had better get back to these little Moo Movers. They are going to take quite a while to finish.

Thanks for coming,

Linton

13 comments:

  1. Linton,

    The body look good.

    As for the underframe, here's a thought. One of the contributors to the colour of that area is the muck from the passengers. I have a Carr's powder that is hard to describe but probably looks like a greeny browny grime and I try to work that around the floor and outside where material was probably hosed out periodically.

    Looking forward to seeing the final result.

    cheers Phil

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    1. Hi Linton, Well done it looks great! Try this link
      for tips on powders.
      Cheers Dean
      http://railsinscale.blogspot.com.au/2011_11_01_archive.html

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  2. G'day Phil and Dean,

    Thanks for the comments and advice/links. Phil, I was wondering if a bit of poo running down the outside would look ok. I am sure there was plenty of it! I would imagine they would have been filthy things to be around when doing the ground work while shunting!

    Dean, thanks for the link. Your blog looks really good. I do like powders because I find them quite controllable. By the way your cattle wagons look the goods.

    Once again thanks. I don't suppose you guys know anything about the gussets on the sides of the under frame?

    Linton

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    1. Sorry mate, Can not help you with the bracing I know very little about early 4 wheel stock.
      Cheers Dean

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  3. Hi Linton,
    Nice work!! Looking forward to the finished model

    Cheers,
    Rob

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    1. Hey Rob,

      Thanks mate! I am looking forward to the finished model as well! ha ha. I wish I had your dedication when building models!

      Linton

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  4. Linton,

    Sorry, I had misread your post. I presume your research has included James McInerney's stock wagon article on his original website. One of the photos in that article shows a very clear image of CW10 at Thirlmere with 5 not 3 plates. His other photos are not clear enough for any definitive answer although the photo of CW 27904 suggests there might be three, one under each main vertical member which is where you would expect to find them. My guess is that the greater number was added as a local retrofit when a van was overhauled. Whether this happened at Thirlmere or earlier in its life is unknown.

    My suggestion, for what its worth, is to leave things as they are for the moment. If you did chose to remove two, you probably should remove all except the middle one and then refix two in line with the uprights.

    cheers Phil

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    1. G'day Phil,

      Yeah I have had a read through James article. The Austrains models are of the 1921 timber under frame version. It was during a club visit that I first heard about them having three gussets. I just didn't have difinitive proof. Looking at a few dark photos it would seem as if three is correct. I think the gussets will line up ok with the timber uprights. Hopefully there will be no need to re-adjust the outside two gussets.

      Thanks for all your help Phil, much appreciated. Your layout is looking very nice also.

      Linton

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  5. Sorry but a follow-on thought. Your waggons have external diagonal bracing indicating that it was one of "38 of these were converted from a number of surplus LVs and GSVs with the standard steel underframe around about 1965" (extract from James McI's article). CW 10 was also one of these. Therefore five gussets is probably correct.

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  6. Linton, I had thought that this is a 1921 type CW - which has a wooden underframe. The photos of 10 and the 27XXX series wagons are no use as they are steel underframe wagons. From memory I think the 1921 wagons had 3 body support gussets on the underframe. The underframe on the model is a compromise of a one for all nature - perfectly understandable of course. if you are modelling the 1950s (?) then dont overdo the bleaching and rust on the metalwork as the wagons were actually pretty well maintained in this period. A lot of the photos on the web are taken of wagons that have been out of use for quite a time. My one nit pick with these and the lovely Eureka stock wagons is the over done timber grain. It sticks out like the proverbials and really does intrude way too much.

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  7. Hi Craig,

    Yeah I believe they are models of the 1921 version. I think your right in having three gussets. Totally agree in having the universal under frame, it makes a hell of a lot of sense! Removing a couple of gussets shouldn't worry too many people.

    I am modelling the 1950s, early fifties actually. I have been searching through all my books for colour photographs and during that era, like most things are hard to come by. I agree in that they probably were not bleached that badly although they had been in use for over 25 years! Pictures of bogie cattle wagons waiting for the scapers torch, like you say are probably not the best reference pieces. Do you know if the timber work on these wagons was preserved in any way? I wonder if they oiled them regularly? The insides would have been better protected. The oil in cattle skin/hair would perhaps offer a little preservation?

    I was actually thinking about toning the wood finish down a little using micro mesh. After considering this for a few minutes I soon decided to just live with it.

    Thanks for you thoughts,

    Linton

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  8. They are definitely models of the 1921 version. If you remove the second and fourth brackets on the underframe you will be correct (the underframe brackets are correct for the upcoming 1929 GSV sheep vans). Same problem with two many and wrong position brackets on the post-war 18' steel underframes under the PV and CV. The weathering on your CW vehicles looks terrific Linton. Even in the early 1950s, after a life of some 30 years, including the Depression and WW2, the vehicles were getting pretty scruffy, so apart from the odd recently outshopped CW, they did look prety faded and workworn, like your model. Keep up the good work! Btw, the reason CW10 (the 1965 rebuild at the RTM) has five brackets is because the underframe was once under a GSV.

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    1. G'day James,

      Thanks James. Your models provide inspiration and your articles provide instruction. The under frames are finished now, for three models anyway, two gussets removed and ready to go. I actually took them to Epping on Saturday and gave them a spin on Waterfall. Yeah i would have thought they would have been in a disgusting state by the fifties. It's a hard thing to scale down filth as I feel you can end up with a model that has too many contrasting weathering features.

      Thanks for the info,

      Linton

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